Growth of Business (The Greenhouse Effect)


As the first leaves break through the ground, that is when the plant is at its most vulnerable.

A business is at its most vulnerable when it is at its infancy, because that is when it becomes exposed to the true environment in which it is to exist. It becomes exposed to competition, in some economies that is when it breaks the minimum tax levels and it becomes to various laws and legislation.

If not protected and well monitored this is the time that it can slink right back into the earth from whence it came.

The seed has to be nurtured by creating a rich mix or medium in which growth is to be fostered. Similarly a business dream has to be soaked in the right nutrients in order for it to have even a single chance at seeing daylight.

A business plan/proposal has to be thoroughly researched and complemented with the right support systems before it is actually launched into the market.

Systems have to be set up to ensure that when the business is rolled out every department and resource is available to kick into action when the relevant function is called into play. It would be a serious hiccup if the company was to produce a product only to realise that a major aspect such as packaging or labeling is not in place. Suddenly, you have an almost complete product sitting in your warehouse crunching money that you do not have to spare out of your pocket every extra minute that it spends there.

In the event that the product is easily perishable every extra minute stored is a minute closer to disaster.
Smart farmers prepare some plants before the season in which they are originally intended to grow in has begun. Some conditions are too harsh for the seedlings to flourish in. Therefore they need to be sheltered before they are exposed to the environment in which they are to spend in their existence in.

Sometimes in business you need to shelter your growing business and protect it from the full scale attack of an open market system, that is why in there are things such as trade restrictions. These are meant to protect the growing firms within a nation from the full scale impact of a harsh and developed economic system.

In this discussion we shall focus on a microclimate of developing a business. In some businesses it is wise to create a business and expose it to a controlled or small market releasing it as a pilot project in order to iron out any unforeseen challenges that would prove catastrophic in a larger scale.

It’s easier to recapitalize a business worth $10000 by 20% of its value than it is to recapitalize a $100000 business. The task of correcting a $2000 mistake is far easier than a $20000 mistake, at times the mistake involves the salaries of your human resources, and human resources are just one resource that you do not want to make a mistake with.

Every single disgruntled employee has the potential to bring down an entire company to its knees, employees are like the roots of a company and anyone of them may be the taproot, which if damaged the entire plant can just shrivel and die.

So the mistakes that are made in a controlled environment are far better than those involved in full scale implementation.

10 disgruntled employees are better managed than a 100. Once a business has grown sufficiently it can gradually be exposed to a larger market growing into new markets and gradually adjusting to correct practice as it grows.

Once it is healthy enough it can fully branch out and realise its full rollout and it has a better chance of success. There is greater possibility of success once you have gained confidence in the viability of your business and you have a few loyal clients to fall back on as well as good contracts with suppliers and markets.

Your human resource base will also be in a better placed position to handle the pressure that is associated with running large scale corporations.

Once an entity has also proven a model at a smaller scale, this means that it is feasible for implementation at a larger scale.

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About potentialtokinetic
A site for writers to express their articles on developmenal issues relevant for a developing world.

4 Responses to Growth of Business (The Greenhouse Effect)

  1. Tendai says:

    These are great posts.
    I did not know that agriculture had any relevance to my job. Keep on going, its encouraging to some of us.

  2. Leo packers says:

    beautiful website with very useful information

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